Q&A: High Intensity Training for Strength vs Size vs Power

Question: I’m interested in trying your high intensity training program and have a few questions. What repetition range should I use if I want to focus on strength without getting too much bigger? What are the best exercises to improve punching power? Shouldn’t I perform my reps explosively to increase power? Answer: How much muscle mass you gain relative to […]

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Is SuperSlow Inferior To Traditional Repetition Speeds?

A recent study published in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research (1) claims SuperSlow is less effective for muscular hypertrophy than traditional reps.  Thirty four women were divided into four groups, a SuperSlow (SS) group, a traditional strength (TS) group, a traditional endurance (TE) group, and a non-exercising control (C) group. Each group performed […]

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High Intensity Training Or High Density Training?

High Intensity Training (HIT)  is progressive resistance exercise performed with high level of effort. High Density Training (HDT) is progressive resistance exercise performed with a high work to rest ratio. Although it is possible to perform HIT without performing HDT by allowing a long rest between exercises, most HIT methods are HDT and are performed with little to no rest […]

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Q&A: Is Intensity Or Volume More Important?

Question: I’ve received similar questions from several readers recently about the relative importance of different training factors for stimulating increases in muscular strength and size. Will increasing intensity or volume produce better results? What matters more, reps and sets or time under load? Does it matter how I distribute the volume of work? Answer: While many of these factors […]

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Don’t Confuse The Force-Velocity Curve With Newton’s Second Law

I recently received a barrage of messages from someone questioning statements I made in my article on the force-velocity curve. He claims I do not understand basic physical principles because he confuses the force-velocity curve with Newton’s second law of motion, which are completely different things. He then builds on his confusion of this in an attempt to make […]

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The Ratio Of Positive To Negative Strength And Implications For Training

While writing the article on the force-velocity curve and it’s implications for training  it occurred to me that it contradicted the claims of Nautilus inventor Arthur Jones of a specific ratio of positive to negative strength. I considered mentioning it in that post, then decided it I ought to save it for a separate article, then forgot about […]

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Thoughts On The Force-Velocity Curve And Implications For Training

The amount of force your muscles are capable of producing varies with both the type and velocity of contraction because of differences in cross-bridge mechanics and the rate at which cross-bridges can be formed. This is known as the force-velocity curve. When you lift a weight your muscles contract concentrically, heads on the myosin filaments attach […]

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